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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
closing loopholes. that is a reputation of what john boehner suggested in the days since the president has been re-elected. >> that's totally right. a key point, the simpson-bowles tax idea is kind of a magic pony, right. everyone agrees in the ab instruct, we can bring down the rates, close loopholes and deductions and raise revenue. if that's such a wonderful idea how come it's only come up now. how come no one has done it. the reason is because it's really, really hard politically. once you get into the specifics. if you're trying to tie all the revenue to this abstract tax reform idea you're going to get into a position where the revenue is about never going to happen because once you get into reality it doesn't materialize. >> you have to do both, john. you have to do -- you have to raise the the rates and close loopholes to get the amount -- >> just raise the rates. >> you can't raise the rates high enough to produce $1.6 trillion. >> you can get $900 billion from expiring the bush tax cuts. >> and where do you get the other $700 billion from from. >> do a little reform and cut the r
boehner, who have already openly said, no increases in tax rates? >> well, you have to splinter off some republicans, in the senate it will be easier because you just have to get to 60. you might pass the december 31st deadline where you have a few more democrats in the senate. but the problem is always going to be the house. i think there may be a bargain in the -- in the side of coming to republicans and saying, here are cuts. but the price of those cuts will be that 2%. republicans will face a very tough choice in just a very short time. are they the ones that are going to be responsible for giving 98% of americans tax hikes? do the republicans want to be known as the party that raised your taxes for everybody but 2%? >> right. and i think, martin -- >> so, the 2% solution may be a noose around the republicans' neck. >> i think the republicans have little leverage. not just for that reason but a couple of other reasons. if you consider the fact that taxes are at 15% of gdp, spending is at 24%, even the paul ryan budget proposes we only reduce spending to 20% of gdp. that means five pe
for the democratic leadership, speaker boehner also intends to stay on, so we'll be seeing some of these elections take place but the big surprise is not a surprise, she's staying put. >> nbc's kelly o'donnell on capitol hill for us. kelly, thanks so much. >>> there is an awful lot happening from capitol hill and during what is expected to be the lame duck session i'll talk with maxine waters next. >>> then just over two hours until the president's news conference, first one difference re-election. what do you think the first question will be? reporters asking about what? tweet me at thomas a. roberts or find me on facebook, thomas a. roberts on msnbc. again? it's embarrassing it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than this...all that prowling around. yeah, you're the king of the jungle. have you thought about going vegan carl? hahaha!! you know folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than antelope with night-vision goggles. nice! get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you f
. >> is that the big onus on john boehner? >> i think it is the onus on all of the negotiators. it's all of them at this point. because that's where the spotlight is. yeah. it's going to be quite a task. we saw that when this happened the last time. it's going to come right up to the line. i think we might be here late december. >> the drama will take us through the end of the year. our power panel, jackie kucinich, blake, robert, thanks to all three of you. >>> up next i'll talk with someone who was in this morning's closed door hearing with general petraeus, republican congressman tom rooney will join the show. what do you think about today's testimony? tweet me your comments at thomas a. roberts. we're back after this. [ male announcer ] when was the last time something made your jaw drop? campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. and you learned something along the way. this is the age of knowing what you're made of. so, why let erectile dysfunc
. >>> if the fiscal cliff negotiations seem familiar, we've seen the movie before. president obama and speaker boehner were unable to reach a debt deal in 2001. one of the by-products of the inaction was a downgrade of the country's credit rating. could this happen again? and what would it mean for the nation's financial standing across the globe? joining me is jared bernstein, senior fellow at the center for budget policies and priorities. good to see you again, when it comes to the credit rating, we've seen it happen before. all three credit rating agencies are saying you've got to put a deal together in washington, if you guys in washington don't get it done, we're going to downgrade your credit. >> we've seen this movie before. it's not a good movie. i will remind viewers that the last time standard and poors did take us down a notch, it actually didn't hurt our ability to finance our debt at all. so that was kind of blown off by the markets, but this time could be different. there's one interesting wrinkle here. i do believe that if the political discourse, which is actually sounding a little bet
boehner. i mean they are the most important players as to whether we get a result. secondly, i've said from day one, i've been saying it for two years, the most important piece of this, andrea, really is medicare because as you look at glen hubbard, as you look at others talking about all these things, the two are intertwined. in other words, as we see true medicare reforms and you see a real solution to medicare, where people know that we've put this behind us and we've dealt with it, i think you see the dial change as it relates to revenue. so, you know, i've been discussing revenues now for at least two years. i do think republicans are open to revenues that are put in place and a pro growth way, but i think people want to see that we've actually dealt with the problem. we haven't generated more revenues without solving the fundamental problems we have and we have what we want to do is put ourselves on a path towards fiscal solvency. i think the key here really is, medicare and to the extent you dial that up and solve it, i think you also dial the other dial which is revenues and i
the microphone with pelosi and with reid and boehner at the side saying that revenue is on the table, but when the talks ramp back up after thanksgiving, is this an issue to be real negotiation or dig-in time? >> i hope it is time for a negotiation. look, if there is one thing that we learned from the president's campaign, he promised to raise taxes on the wealthy. and here is a news flash to the republicans out there, elections have consequences, and that is what he wants to do, and i'm sure he is going to accomplish some of that, but on either side when you dig in before the negotiations start, not only does it look bad, it makes the markets go up and down, and it creates instability, and insecurity among the people out here in the country feeling the pain and the brunt of some of the economic policies and the fact of the matter is that both sides need to come into it with some level of give and take, and that is how you govern and get it done, and if the president is going to ak kccomplish the polis that he did in first term that he promised in the second, he is going to have to get some of
and you see speaker boehner clearly wants a deal and, perhaps, has more leverage now with the house republican caucus, but once you get down to the actual negotiations, there are some very tough issues here, a reason this has not been resolved in previous summits. >> that's right but i am optimistic there was a clear mandate, the mandate was for solving our problems. i'm encouraged at no labels.org, an organization that has about 600,000 people, is putting together a group of 40 members of congress evenly split between democrats and republicans who are agreeing to come together as a problem solver's caucus, that the leadership can go to and cut deals on these important problems like the fiscal cliff, education. we have members of congress that recognize that people want them to be problem solvers and work across the aisle. we'll be announcing these 40 members in short order and that represents the kind of mood we're seeing in the shift in congress. >> let me ask you both about mitt romney's post-election comments last wednesday, be in a telephone conference call with donors. many of
can pass the alternative. but it's your problem to get the votes. and boehner would be well put not to try to cut a deal with obama but instead to say paul ryan's going to bring a solution to the fix, we're going to gather votes for it. i guarantee you, you'll get the right to have a democratic substitute. and if you can get enough republicans to vote for it, terrific. but they do not have an obligation to concede that the only mandate in washington is the president's. >> you're talking about chains hiring people for 29 hours. i'm hearing that from small business owners across pensacola. >> yeah. >> my own district. on election night i got three different e-mails from small business owners going it's sad -- and i said this on the air a couple days ago. they said i'm going to have to put these people on for less than 30 hours and i'm going to lose my best people. i can choose to do that or fire six, seven people because my margins are so small i'm fighting to keep my business open. >> you track the number of layoffs and closures in the first week since the election, it's sobering
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)